women’s march

I’m burned out. For reasons too mundane to go into, I haven’t left the house. But, from my screens, I watched the Women’s March unfold across the world.1 And. I am so thankful! I’m sure I’m not the only one too tired, too burdened to get up and do much these days beyond ruminate, plan, vision, and meet the demands of my regular routine. I’m so thankful for the multitudes of people who moved their bodies in a show of solidarity with each other and the vulnerable and against the forces of white supremacy and oppressive patriarchy.

The things I’ve learned and seen in the last 48 hours alone… have served to confirm for me that we are in a terrible, terrible, terrible position.

The borders are tightening – literally.

The gaslighting has started in earnest as it now has the official and complete weight of the Executive branch behind it.2

The things I’ve learned and seen in the last 48 hours alone… have served to confirm for me that we are very powerful.

Let us carry the image of all of these people gathered against the forces of fascism; we, the people, are so atomized that in our daily lives, that when it is incumbent upon us to stand up as individuals, the image of those who gathered to protest will energize us.

Let us to talk to each other, listen to each other, and tell the truth of our experiences.

Bryan Woolston / Reuters
Bryan Woolston / Reuters
Lucy Nicholson / Reuters
Lucy Nicholson / Reuters
Crowds of people descend on Washington. Amanda Voisard / The Washington Post
Crowds of people descend on Washington. Amanda Voisard / The Washington Post
The Black Women of Congress speak at the march. Amanda Voisard / The Washington Post
The Black Women of Congress speak at the march. Amanda Voisard / The Washington Post
Batalá Washington, an all female Afro-Brazilian percussion band, marches down Constitution Avenue. Sarah L. Voisin / The Washington Post
Batalá Washington, an all female Afro-Brazilian percussion band, marches down Constitution Avenue. Sarah L. Voisin / The Washington Post
Amanda Voisard / The Washington Post
Amanda Voisard / The Washington Post
In Seattle, Washington, native American women singers and drummers lead a women's march of thousands as it arrives at the Seattle Center, on January 21, 2017. Women across the Pacific Northwest marched in solidarity with the Women's March on Washington and to send a message in support of women's rights and other causes. Elaine Thompson / AP
In Seattle, Washington, native American women singers and drummers lead a women’s march of thousands as it arrives at the Seattle Center, on January 21, 2017. Women across the Pacific Northwest marched in solidarity with the Women’s March on Washington and to send a message in support of women’s rights and other causes. Elaine Thompson / AP
Protesters take a selfie with the police as a backdrop outside the U.S. Capital during the Women's March on Washington on January 21, 2017. Jessica Kourkounis / Getty
Protesters take a selfie with the police as a backdrop outside the U.S. Capital during the Women’s March on Washington on January 21, 2017. Jessica Kourkounis / Getty
A crowd fills Independence Avenue during the Women's March on Washington, DC, on January 21, 2017. Alex Brandon / AP
A crowd fills Independence Avenue during the Women’s March on Washington, DC, on January 21, 2017. Alex Brandon / AP
Evelyn Hockstein / The Washington Post
Evelyn Hockstein / The Washington Post
Sarah L. Voisin / The Washington Post
Sarah L. Voisin / The Washington Post

  1. Typing ‘across the world’ made me :) ↩︎
  2. How big was the crowd? ↩︎